So What is Design then? Part 3

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Vecteezy | So What is Design then? Part 3 | Design Partnership Australia
Vecteezy | So What is Design then? Part 3 | Design Partnership Australia

So what is Design then?


As we have established yesterday, design is not a stage of a project. It’s the beginning, the middle and the end and some would argue that there is never any end. The exact meaning however of the word design, depends on the context and can also mean a variety of different things. There are many different forms of design, however, every type of design exists to solve problems. In order to solve problems, one must first be able to see it and in order to see it, one must be able to collect all the data around them. That’s when real problem solving and thus real design starts. It's neither art nor science, but probably rather a careful blend of the two.



“Design is a solution to a problem. Art is a question to a problem.” John Maeda


However, unlike art design does not have to be original. Designers are not inventors. They are problem solvers and for every problem, there are often many tried and tested solutions whether in your category of design or outside of it. It is true that design can often be dressed in a fashion that has wider or less visual appeal. This is as true for furniture, architecture, space, and object as it is for a user interface.


So how does one go about problem-solving?


It starts with understanding the problem 1st. Why does the problem exist and is the problem worthy of a solution? Can the problem be solved with an existing set of solutions or does it require an entirely new approach? The answer lies partly in empathy. Being able to immerse oneself deep enough, long enough and sincerely enough into the problem or set of problems so as to understand the true responsibility and opportunity at hand. Furthermore, a problem can only be solved once one starts asking the right questions. New approaches must only be implemented if one is 100% convinced that the existing ones will not do.


Within understanding this then of course one must also be 100% mindful of the fact that the way humans behave can very seldom be altered and that the best design solutions are most often found in designing for how they behave naturally within a specific context. Designing for Human behaviour is therefore almost always better than designing for behavioural change.



What does Designing for Human Behaviour mean?

More about this in our next newsletter... What does Designing for Human Behaviour mean?


 

Article Acknowledgements:

1. Vecteezy

 

Author: Callie Van Der Merwe Editor: Roberto Zambri


About the Author: Callie is an Architect turned Interior Designer turned

Human Behaviour Designer. He is also the founder of

DESIGN PARTNERSHIP AUSTRALIA


Learn more about Designing for Human Behaviour.

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